The 10 best post-apocalyptic movies and TV shows on Netflix

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You would think the appetite for end-of-civilization stories would wane during an actual global pandemic. But while many Netflix subscribers tried to forget about the outside world from the start by immersing themselves in the Tiger King craziness, others doubled down on all the gloom by sending Outbreak and Contagion to the top of the most watched list. .

And the streaming giant has continued to deal with these gluttons to punish them in 2021: Awake, Sweet Tooth, and a second season of Black Summer will all drop within the next month. If pure escape isn’t your bag, then check out 10 of the service’s best post-apocalyptic originals.

Bird box

Bird box

(Image credit: Netflix)

Apparently 45 million Netflix viewers celebrated Christmas 2018 by watching a claustrophobic horror about a mysterious entity that drives anyone who sees it to suicide. Bird Box can therefore seem clearly un-festive. But with one of Hollywood’s friendliest stars as a blindfolded heroine and a plotline reflecting one of the year’s biggest surprise hits, you can understand the reasons why she became a favorite of the year. dinner after the turkey. The adaptation of Josh Malerman’s novel of the same name doesn’t quite reach the same heights as the same A Quiet Place theme. However, backed up by Sandra Bullock’s brilliantly brave lead performance, it’s still a tense, tense survival story that will keep you glued to it.

In the night

In the night

(Image credit: Netflix)

A hijacked plane must outrun the sun, after its rays have wiped out the earth’s population. Into the Night sounds like one of the many wonders of a top season that have emerged in the wake of Lost. But Netflix’s first Belgian original has already been renewed for a second series, thanks to surprisingly strong character development, an engaging and diverse cast, and an ability to keep you going throughout its six episodes. Best of all, its short run time means you can binge on everything in an afternoon. Don’t read too much about the science behind the disaster.

What happened to Monday?

What happened to Monday?

(Image credit: Netflix)

Giving Orphan Black’s Tatiana Maslany a run for her money, Noomi Rapace plays seven identical twins with seven distinct personalities in this logic-defying but still entertaining dystopian sci-fi. What happened to Monday? is in the near future, where a one-child policy has been implemented to combat overpopulation. But after spending 30 years masquerading as the same person, it’s only now that Rapace’s group of Karens must overcome several threats – including Glenn Close in a more overtly mean form than Cruella de Vil – to stay. desire. Sure, it’s full of glaring plot holes, but director Tommy Wirkola (the man behind the Nazi zombie-killer horror Dead Snow) patched them up with plenty of B-movie thrills.

The society

The society

(Image credit: Seacia Pavao / Netflix)

A group of all-American teens (played by actors obviously in their mid-twenties, of course) return home after an excursion to find that all of humanity has mysteriously vanished. At first glance, The Society looks like your average brilliant YA drama. But amid all the high school clichés, there are also debates about the power of democracy, privilege, and religion, aligning it with the existential mystery of HBO’s The Leftovers just as much as the glowing chaos of HBO. Riverdale. Sadly, real-world events put an end to a second series, but the first still contains a resolution that is good enough to make it worth the investment.

Army of the dead

Army of the dead

(Image credit: Clay Enos / Netflix)

After nearly a decade of increasingly bloated shenanigans in the DC Extended Universe, Zack Snyder has returned to his genre roots this year with arguably his most entertaining film since Dawn of the Dead. Despite its title, this quintessentially OTT mash-up is not affiliated with its 2004 remake of the classic Romero. Instead, it’s a separate franchise generator (a prequel and animated TV spin-off to follow soon) where a motley team of specialists plan to rob a casino, which like the rest of its set of Las Vegas zombie, is on the verge of obtaining a nuclear government. Sure, it’s completely ridiculous, but unlike most of Snyder’s comics, it doesn’t forget to be fun.

Tribes of Europe

Tribes of Europe Netflix

(Image credit: Gordon Timpen)

Seemingly conceived in response to Brexit, Tribes of Europa follows three gung-ho siblings who attempt to reunite the continent after a cataclysmic event dubbed Black December that split it into several warring factions. And a mysterious cube found in the wreckage of a plane crash seems to hold the key. Set in 2074, 45 years after the said disaster, this dystopian science fiction is not for the faint of heart. There is almost as much brutality and bloodshed in its six episodes as there is in the entirety of Game of Thrones. But as it is produced by the team behind Netflix’s German hit, Dark, such hyperviolence is counterbalanced by beautiful cinematography and rich mythology that is worth exploring further.

Midnight sky

Midnight sky

(Image credit: Netflix)

George Clooney plays a dual role in this decidedly frigid end-of-the-world drama that suggests he was taking notes while filming Steven Soderbergh’s Solaris. Returning to screens for the first time since 2016, the director plays a terminally ill scientist from the Arctic Circle who must warn a space team returning from Jupiter that an Earth struck by radiation is no longer hospitable. Drenched in melancholy, The Midnight Sky is far more interested in brooding over human connection, redemption, and the future of civilization than delivering high-octane action. Though the sets, including a perilous spacewalk, ensure there is still something to feast the eyes on, while Alexandre Desplat’s evocative score ensures it sounds just as majestic.

The rain

The rain: season 3

(Image credit: Netflix)

If The Rain had arrived in the midst of the dystopian young adult boom, rather than at the end, it would have deserved more attention. In this Danish original, toxic rain is the enemy, having wiped out almost the entire Scandinavian population, with siblings Rasmus and Simone – who have just emerged from an underground bunker after six years – the reluctant heroes. As they search for both the father who left them and a cure, the couple team up with several other endearing young survivors, most of whom have their own compelling stories. If you thought Nordic TV was all about black crime and woolly sweaters, think again.

Cargo

A still from the film Cargo

(Image credit: Netflix)

Adapted from a short film of the same name released four years earlier, 2017’s Underrated and Underrated Cargo brings something a little different to the crowded zombie stable. First, there’s the burnt-out setting of the Australian outback, which allows directors Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke to explore all of the undead drama from an Aboriginal perspective. Then there’s the fact that anyone bitten takes 48 hours to transform into a full-fledged flesh eater – a delay that gives Martin Freeman’s newly infected father the chance to find a nanny for his daughter before he does. does not meet the same enraged fate as his wife. Few zombie movies have touched the heart so effectively.

Dawn

Dawn

(Image credit: Netflix)

Don’t let the fact that this bizarre comedy-drama was canceled by Netflix after just one season put you off. Laughing with both Gen Z and Gen Z, Daybreak is a cheerfully anarchic adaptation of Brian Ralph’s comic book series of the same name that combines the postmodernism of Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick even appears) with the post-apocalyptic tribalism of Mad. Max.

Colin Ford takes center stage as the transfer student is determined to find his missing girlfriend following a nuclear explosion that has turned all adults into bloodthirsty mutants. But it’s his arsonist tweens and samurai-turned buddies who steal the show in a refreshing alternative to all of YA’s serious dishes.

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